Tag Archives: crater lake

The Equator…. Finally!

Travelling South out of Colombia

Travelling South out of Colombia

We left Salento and headed South. We made a stop outside Cali at a nice, quiet Hostel on a river in a beautiful valley. It was Sunday and the small towns and river banks along our route were packed with people taking advantage of the nice weather and weekend. It was a completely different place when we left the next morning with the streets pretty much deserted!

Camping outside of Cali.

Camping outside of Cali.

We then headed towards Ecuador and were hoping to hit the border town to spend the night, so we could cross over first thing the next morning. The mountain roads and traffic were a lot slower than we had expected, so we ended up pulling into a big 24hr gas station and asking to spend the night. No problem! Not the best of sleeps but a relatively safe place to hunker down for a few hours.

Sleeping with the trucks again!

Sleeping with the trucks again!

Beautiful hills in Southern Colombia

Beautiful hills in Southern Colombia

The next morning we were up early and made a stop to see a very cool church that is built on a bridge! Las Lajas Sanctuary is a Gothic style church that is built on the site where an apparition of the Virgin Mary was seen in the rocks. It’s also a popular pilgrimage site with many people claiming miraculous healing. An impressive place!

The view down to the church (bottom right, in the valley)

The view down to the church (bottom right, in the valley)

Las Lajas Sanctuary

Las Lajas Sanctuary

The inside of the church, with the cliff wall behind the altar.

The inside of the church, with the cliff wall behind the altar.

After the church we crossed into Ecuador with ease despite a bit of waiting in line ups. We even picked up a fellow Canadian traveller who we drove to our next destination, Otavalo, Ecuador.

This weeks travels in Equador

This weeks travels in Equador

Otovalo is known for having the largest market in all of South America! Well at least on the weekends but sadly (or gladly depending on how you look at it!), the majority of stalls, and all the live animal market was closed and the scene was very laid back. There was still a good market and Dave did end up getting a very dapper Ecuador hat!

Numerous soft and fluffy things available at the market

Numerous soft and fluffy things available at the market

Dave with his new 'Ecuador Hat'

Dave with his new ‘Ecuador Hat’

QUICK TRIVIA: Panama hats are actually originally from Ecuador. In 1945 for the World Fair Ecuador sent over all kinds of hats but since they travelled through Panama to get there the people in Paris assumed it was made in Panama. So poor Ecuador got no credit at all!

Our view over the town of Otovalo

Our view over the town of Otovalo

After hanging out at some nice cottages overlooking Otavalo we hit the road again and finally crossed the equator. It’s about time! And it’s only taken us 7.5 months. But it was very cool to see the line and a good photo opportunity. Now wouldn’t you think that the equator would have nice hot weather?!

Christine posing over the equator line

Christine posing over the equator line

Each in our 'home' hemispheres

Each in our ‘home’ hemispheres

Next we drove into Cotopaxi National Park to do some hiking and biking. Cotopaxi is the second highest mountain in Ecuador and is a snow capped vision (and an active volcano)! When you can see it that is! The roads were a bit rough going into the park especially this one corrugated area where we thought the van was going to vibrate to bits. Thankfully she didn’t, but we did manage to squash and cut a cable on our auxiliary battery, causing a short circuit with the battery. There was smoke, and a lot of running around and panicking, but phewf no fire!

Smoke and burn marks on the battery cover...

Smoke and burn marks on the battery cover…

Badly overheated battery cables

Badly overheated battery cables

The shakes also wiggled our furnace into not working. And when you’re on the side of a glacier mountain this really sucks!

Camping in view of the volcano

Camping in view of the volcano

All the winter gear was required up here (over 3800m elevation)

All the winter gear was required up here (over 3800m elevation)

We stayed on the mountain for two cold nights with all our blankets and thermal undies on. We could have handled the cold but on our lovely long bike ride around the valleys an unexpected storm blew in with heavy rain and hail

Christine catching her breath - biking at 4000m is just as hard as hiking!

Christine catching her breath – biking at 4000m is just as hard as hiking!

Another one of our 'typical' volcano photos...

Another one of our ‘typical’ volcano photos…

Christine keeping her dental skills up

Christine keeping her dental skills up

The roads turned into gushing rivers full of hail and our hands seized up from the cold. And the lightening was stiking so close it was scary! We were soaked to the bone and poor Dave just couldn’t get warm again. After a few hours and a long hot shower we started to feel our toes again.

New snow on the volcano - this fell during the storm of our bike ride...

New snow on the volcano – this fell during the storm of our bike ride…

We picked up another traveller coming from the park! This time a British guy who was having a hard time in Ecuador with tales of being robbed and being taken advantage of. Hope we helped him a bit! We dropped him off on the Quilitoa Loop which is a beautiful yet rough road around a volcanic lake and surrounding lush valleys.

Patchwork hills around Quilatoa

Patchwork hills around Quilatoa

The crater lake of Quilatoa

The crater lake of Quilatoa

Pretty and impressive! We had planned to hike around the crater lake, but the weather didn’t cooperate and with rain in the long and short-term forecast we decided to move on.

The loop road around Quilatoa

The loop road around Quilatoa

Beautiful views from the loop road

Beautiful views from the loop road

We moved on to the little town of Banos where we were the only guests at the Pequeno Paraiso Hostal. The owners are ex-overland bus drivers and specialize in taking in the huge overlanding tour groups, but the season hasn’t started yet.

The grounds at Pequeno Paraiso hostel

The grounds at Pequeno Paraiso hostel

Enjoying a 3 course lunch in Banos - all for US$2.50 - amazing!

Enjoying a 3 course lunch in Banos – all for US$2.50 – amazing!

With the entire run of the place we got Ginger all  fixed up again! That includes running new battery cables and getting the furnace working again. Dave is not only handsome, but handy too!

Christine checking the electrical connections to the furnace

Christine checking the electrical connections to the furnace

Dave running new cables back to the auxiliary battery

Dave running new cables back to the auxiliary battery

A big development in our plans is that we have found a buyer for Ginger! A few weeks ago we put her up for sale on a website popular with people doing similar trips as ours. Well wouldn’t you know we received an email from a British/Canadian guy who is keen to buy Ginger for a year of exploring around South America! A few logistics still to be worked out, but we are very happy that she’ll have a great new owner, and that we don’t need to stress out about finding a buyer any more.

Tomorrow we plan on getting into seeing the sights around here before moving on and finding some new places to explore.

 

This weeks banner - biking around Cotopaxi National Park - in the cold and thin air.

This weeks banner – biking around Cotopaxi National Park – in the cold and thin air.

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Just Coast-ing

After visiting Mt St Helen’s we headed South into Oregon.  Dropped into the city of Portland for some great pizza for dinner and a nice walk around the city centre.  As it was still Labor Day weekend we opted to spend another night in a Walmart to avoid the crowds.  We chose one right near the big factory outlet stores as this was the plan for the next morning.  As far as the Walmart camping, it has definitely improved since our Abbotsford experience.  Our two most recent nights in a Walmart have been quiet and we both slept well.

The outlet stores turned into a big day of shopping, where we both bought enough t-shirts (much needed) to last us until 2022.  We also visited an REI outdoor store and kitted ourselves out with a tent, sleeping bags, sleeping mats, and a cooker.  Now we are all prepared for some backcountry exploring in the California National Parks.  California here we come!!!

After the hassles of city life we decided to head for the coast again.  We easily got a nice campsite since all the weekenders were gone home and the school year has started.  Now it’s just us and all the gray nomads!  We’ve spent most of the week slowly working our way down the Oregon Coast which has been stunningly beautiful.   ‘A real treat’ said a park ranger and we must agree.

On Cannon beach – ‘The Haystack’ in the background

View along the Oregon coast

Beautiful views while driving the Oregon coast

The bummer was that it was mostly enveloped in a thick cold fog which limited the, what must have been, spectacular views.

Heavy fog along sections of the coast

Fog rolling onto the beach

We had a lot of fun playing on the sand dunes which can be up to 150m tall and extend for kilometres from the beach.  Well, except for the nosedive that Dave took but sadly due to a camerawoman malfunction there is no photographic evidence – darn.  It was pretty funny and no one was hurt in the process, besides Dave’s pride. There are huge dune areas where you can go crazy on dune buggies, though we decided rolling down the dunes was more fun, and cheaper.

Christine climbing a sand dune

Dave and dune buggies

Christine having some fun

Dave descending Bear Gryll’s style

One of the big concerns we had on the way across Canada was getting Ginger up and over the Rocky Mountains, and especially Rogers Pass which was a climb to 1300m.  We thought that once she was over that it would be an easy run all the way South.  So it came as a bit of a surprise when we had to pull Ginger over for a cool down after she had climbed 700m without a break.  A quick check of the map gave us an even greater suprise when we saw two more passes we had to go over, both over 1500m high.  Oh well, nothing for it but to give it a try.  This was all because we decided to head inland to check out Crater Lake National Park, which as the name suggest is a lake inside a volcano crater.  By the end of the day Ginger had climbed from sea level to over 2300m, a great achievement for the ol’ girl, and a good confidence booster for us.

Not a bad view while letting Ginger have a breather

We had a quick view of the lake as the sun was going down, and decided to head back in the morning for another look and a hike along the calderas edge.

The sun setting over Crater Lake

 

Crater Lake

 

On our morning hike

Great views during the climb

We are now stopped for quick re-supply, and hope to be in California this afternoon!

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