The best and worst of Peru

This weeks travels

This weeks travels

We have had an interesting week since the last blog. The highlight, obviously, was the surreal and amazing site of Machu Picchu. The low was in the southern town next to Lake Titicaca where our van was broken into and lots of our stuff was stolen.

So let’s start with the positive! From Cusco we got a little collectivo bus to Ollantayambo where we caught the lovely tourist train with panoramic windows up to the town of Aguas Calientes, which sits below the site of Machu Picchu (Would you believe we sat across from a guy from Sydney, Nova Scotia who told us his whole life story on the 2 hour ride!)

Ready to board

Ready to board

We got off the train and successfully found a horrible dive of a hotel. It was only after we paid that we saw all the mold and felt that everything was damp. We asked for a different room with an actual window which seemed to help, so hopefully we haven’t shaved off too much of our life.

We headed directly for the hot springs, which the town is named for and soaked in the fabulous water with all the other tourists.

The hot pools in Aguas Calientes

The hot pools in Aguas Calientes

After we were suitably poached we had dinner at one of the restaurants that are always harassing you as you go by. We tucked in early and managed to get a couple of hours of sleep in our stinky room.

4:30am and we were up and at ’em. We walked out of town to the trail that headed straight up the 400m to Machu Picchu. We waited with loads of others for the gate to open at 5am and then the fun started. It was a difficult way to wake up but we made it up all the way, then made our way to one of the terraces to enjoy the sunrise over Machu Piccu.

Our first view over Machu Picchu in the morning

Our first view over Machu Picchu in the morning

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Mornin' guys! Wachu lookin at?

Mornin’ guys! Wachu lookin at?

However the sun didn’t rise so much as it just got light. But it was still stunning and we tried to enjoy it peacefully despite a lot of not so quiet tourists. Can’t tell you how many times people told us to get out of their photos when we were just innocent bystanders! And they didn’t do it nicely!

After we had fully appreciated the initial view of Machu Picchu we moved on and headed to the Inca Bridge which is a very thin bridge and path running along a cliff face on the mountain. I guess you used to be able to cross it but Madeleine (Christine’s mom) said that someone fell off and that was the end of that. Don’t think I would have been brave enough to try it anyways!

Dave at the Inca Bridge

Dave at the Inca Bridge

The obligatory couple photo at Machu Picchu

The obligatory couple photo at Machu Picchu

Christine enjoying the view

Christine enjoying the view

We also signed up (payed for!) the extra treat of walking up Machu Picchu Mountain which is the forgotten mountain behind all the typical pictures you see. The one you see in the pictures is Huayna Picchu and is much shorter. Both have limits of 400 maximum tourists that can climb them each day. We thought we were lucky but quickly figured out that it was quite a hike and it took us a total of 4 hours! And a climb of another 600m!

Christine climbing the endless steps up Machu Picchu Mountain

Christine climbing the endless steps up Machu Picchu Mountain (a good view though!)

It was definitely worthwhile though, and we enjoyed the quiet and tranquility at the top, especially compared to the hairy main area full of self important tourists. We also got some great views of Machu Picchu.

Looking down onto Machu Picchu

Looking down onto Machu Picchu

Great views from the top

Great views from the top

Exploring the actual site (with the mountain we climbed in the background)

Exploring the actual site

Machu Picchu terraces, with the mountain we climbed in the background

Machu Picchu, with the mountain we climbed in the background

Overall Machu Picchu was excellent and a definite highlight of our entire trip.

We got back to Ginger late on Friday night and were ready to roll early the next day. Our next destination was Tinajani Canyon which was really cool and a great place to camp. We even managed to get a bit of a walk in before the wind and cold came with the night.

Driving through the high plains in Peru

Driving through the high plains in Peru

The view from our camp in the canyon

The view from our camp in the canyon

Looking down into the canyon (can you spot Ginger by the bridge?)

Looking down into the canyon (can you spot Ginger by the bridge?)

Looking along the beautiful canyon

Looking along the beautiful canyon

Now the bad: we made our way to the town of Puno which is the jumping off point to the floating village of Uros.

The floating reed islands of Uros

The floating reed islands of Uros

Outside a typical reed house

Outside a typical reed house

We parked by the ferry terminal in a large busy open carpark with lots of people around. The ferry ride and tour to the floating moss/reed islands was about 3 hours so we were back at Ginger by 3pm. Dave noticed right away that the back door lock was busted and that the door was unlocked. Christine jumped in and immediately checked our safe which thankfully had not been touched, and still had everything in it. We then started to take inventory of what was missing. Some of the big stuff was Christine’s E-book, her awesome big backpack, all of our jackets and the biggest bummer was all our electical cables and chargers! We started asking the people milling around the van if they saw anything but of course no one said anything and avoided us. Next was a trip to the police. Christine grabbed a ride up into the main square where the tourist police are, but the policeman said that it was Sunday and that the bank doesn’t open until Monday at 8am so they couldn’t do anything until then (You have to pay to get a police report apparently….?). Christine asked for them to come down and see but they weren’t interested. Times like these make you want to pack it in and just go home.

We were only supposed to be passing through Puno but now we needed to stick around to make a police report the next day. We talked to some other overlander’s who thankfully were also parked in the same parking lot and they decided that if we all banded together we would be able to stick it out in the car park for the night. So everyone pulled up alongside of us and we then took turns watching the vehicles. It’s times like these that you really appreciate your fellow travellers!

Fellow overlanders 'circling the wagons' after we were broken into

Fellow overlanders ‘circling the wagons’ after we were broken into

Thankfully David was able to pull the door apart to disconnect the lock barrel and get the locking mechanism working again, otherwise we would have had to have slept with the door unlocked.

The next day we took a few hours and got the police report completed and then went on a search for some replacement cables. So far we’ve gotten a laptop one but the tricky one is going to be for our Canon camera which has a funky seperate battery charger that’s not likely going to be found. Oh well, we feel we got away quite lightly and know that it could have been much worse. We are also so glad that we decided to install the safe before leaving Halifax.

Today we got the heck out of Puno, and even right out of Peru! Looking back on Peru we are not sure whether we really liked it or not. There are some amazing sights to see, and some really nice national parks to visit, and we did meet some fantastic and truly friendly people. However, we also found the day to day to be quite difficult, and a lot of the people unfriendly or unhelpful. The van was twice hit with thrown objects (fruit) which has never happened before. The drivers in Peru are truly awful, and put our lives at risk often. Their favourite trick was to pass you with horn blaring and headlights flashing, only to stop right in front of you 15 seconds later to pick up some passengers. Obviously getting robbed puts a big downer on the country, but we’re not sure we’d hurry back, especially now that we’ve seen the famous sights. Maybe we just need to give it some time….

Christine wearing all of her remaining winter clothes... they took the jacket, but not the hood

Christine wearing all of her remaining winter clothes… they took the jacket, but not the hood

We are currently camped in the Bolivia International airport carpark enjoying their security and free wifi.

 

This weeks banner - the view across Lake Titicaca in Bolivia

This weeks banner – the view across Lake Titicaca in Bolivia

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5 Comments

Filed under General News

5 responses to “The best and worst of Peru

  1. Peter Moore

    What a bummer! Certainly imprints a big negative on a country when something like that happens. Oh well, at leat they left Ginger! The shots of Machu Pichu look great and you will have them long after the upsets have faded. Pete

  2. Madeleine

    oh Christine, I laughed my head off at what remained of your winter gear ! Sorry about that but great that you can still see the humor in it all. Bravo and good for you and Dave.
    Mom and Dad B.

  3. Marguerite Flinn

    Sorry about the robbery and love the jacketless hood!! You are brave and courageous. Machu Pichu is breath-taking. Keep on trekking. It will be worth it for sure. Love Marg

  4. Thanks for your positive thoughts. We are pretty much over the robbery now. We picked up some new jackets and electrical connectors in La Paz yesterday, so are all ready to hit the road again. Next up – hot springs in Potosi and the famous salt flats!
    Love,
    Dave and Christine

  5. Rick & Kathy

    Hi Christine and Dave,
    Rick & Kathy here, (remember us?) We are finally home from Mexico and I’m enjoying reading your blog. Better late than never. All this mention of a dress makes me think there’s a wedding in the plans? Felicitaciones!!! I wanted to email you and ask a few questions, I’ll try to find a more private way. Can’t wait to finish reading all your adventures, you both look great and we are so happy to have met you. Best of luck on the rest of your trip.

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